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Sport NI Report Skiffie Worlds 2016

Report on Skiffie Worlds that took place in the Quoile estuary July 2016

STRANGFORD LOUGH SAC/SPA CONSERVATION OBJECTIVES

Strangford Lough is not a static system, but is subject to natural change both in terms of its biological communities and its geomorphology.  The conservation objectives are designed to accommodate the dynamic nature of the site.  In overall terms, Strangford Lough was deemed to be in Favourable Condition at the time of its designation.  This does not rule out setting targets that will enhance the condition of any feature or sub-feature.

STRANGFORD LOUGH ECOLOGICAL CHANGE INVESTIGATION (SLECI) June 2004

The establishment of kelp grids for seaweed cultivation in the 18th Century marks the first aquaculture activity in Strangford Lough. Seaweed cultivation and harvesting for soda production probably continued for over 100 years until its demise in the 1830s when it became uneconomic (McErlean 2002). This period probably represents the greatest impact on the intertidal areas of the Lough in recorded history. Experimental studies into the growth of the oysters Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis by Parsons (1974) and Briggs (1978) demonstrated the suitability of Strangford Lough for oyster culture and stimulated its development in the Lough. Consequently, aquaculture in the Lough, which started in the 1970s with a few producers, focused initially on oysters (Figure 1). For example, Cuan Oysters, which was established in 1974, played an important role in the development of aquaculture in the UK by pioneering culture methods for very small hatchery-reared oyster seed. Cuan Oysters is currently the major producer of oysters in Strangford Lough, and one of the main producers in the UK, handling over 400 tonnes of oysters per annum (http://www.cuanoysters.com/seafood/index.html). Aquaculture in Strangford Lough continues to focus entirely on bivalves but now includes mussels and scallops as well as Pacific and native oysters. This section reviews the development of aquaculture since the 1970s in the context of recent ecological changes and the Shellfish Aquaculture

Strangford Lough SAC / SPA Management Scheme, Environment and Heritage Service, May 2001

People have inhabited the shores of Strangford Lough and used its resources for 9000 years. Today local people continue to play a very important role in shaping and managing the area. The past 20 years, however, have witnessed some dramatic changes in terms of the area’s socio-economic development. This is partly because Strangford Lough, one of the most important environmental sites in Europe, is not a remote wilderness but lies within an hour’s drive of Belfast city centre.

Strangford Lough & Lecale by Bob Brown

This booklet has been produced in association with the Strangford Lough and Lecale Partnership (SLLP) and its Turn O' the Tide programme, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. It is part of work to help connect people with their heritage and to develop a management strategy for the Strangford and Lecale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Dr. Bob Brown is a marine biologist and former Director of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds in Northern Ireland. He lives in Lecale and has drawn on many sources in writing this booklet, not least his own intimate knowledge of the area. Copies of this book can be collected form the SLLP office in Portaferry.

Strangford Lough and Lecale Action Plan 2013 - 2018

Action Plan Aims Aim 1: To conserve and engage people with the built and natural heritage. Aim 2: To use Heritage to promote the health and well-being of local people and visitors. Aim 3: To build prosperity and facilitate Research and Development through the environmentally sustainable use of the heritage.

Strangford Lough and Lecale Heritage Management Strategy 2013 -2018

Strangford Lough and Lecale is outstandingly beautiful with one of the world's finest examples of drumlin hill and island landscape. It is of international importance for its marine life and coastal birds and it is renowned for its Christian and maritime heritage. The landscape, built heritage and natural environment of Strangford and lecale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty are fundamental to the well-being and vibrancy of local communities. Our heritage attracts and interest visitors, generates wealth. For these reasons, as well as for their intrinsic value, we must work together to protect and enhance our heritage, while fostering appropriate human activities and development