ARDS AND NORTH DOWN BOROUGH COUNCIL BELIEVED TO BE FIRST TO PURCHASE SEABINS

Created on: Monday, 17 September 2018. Posted in: Press Releases

ARDS AND NORTH DOWN BOROUGH COUNCIL BELIEVED TO BE FIRST TO PURCHASE SEABINS
Ards and North Down Borough Council is believed to be the first Council in Northern Ireland to make a stand against water pollants if the initiative is ratified by full council at the end of the month.
The Environment Committee last night (5 June 18) has agreed the purchase a number of state-of-the-art seabins - floating garbage bins that suck waste from the water of docks and marinas, leaving water rubbish free. It is hoped the initiative will be ratified by full council by the end of the month.
The bins, which will be positioned along the Ards and North Down coastline, are the first project of many to be being paid for by the Council’s Recycling Community Investment Fund, established in response to residents engaging with Ards and North Down Borough Council’s recycling scheme. To date over £100m has been saved as a direct result of residents recycling more food waste.
Stephen Addy, Head of Regulatory Services, said: “The Recycling Community Investment Fund was established in 2016 as a thank you to residents for their re-cycling efforts. Each year it is being used to fund a variety of projects that directly benefit local residents.
“As a Borough with 110 miles of coastline and which draws tourists as a result of its waterways, harbours and marinas, this initiative will help in our fight against the eight million pieces of plastic that find their way into our oceans daily, making the sea a cleaner and safer place for both residents and local marine wildlife.”
A seabin is a floating natural fiber rubbish bin that moves up and down with the tide collecting floating rubbish. Water is sucked in from the surface and passes through a catch bag inside the Seabin, with a submersible water pump. Water is pumped back into the marina leaving litter and debris trapped in a special catch bag so that it can be disposed of properly. Seabins can collect up to half a ton of debris each year and have the potential to collect a percentage of oils and pollutants floating on the water surface.
Seabins are the brainchild of two Australian surfers, Pete Ceglinski and Andrew Turton. To date over 200 bins are in currently in operation globally with demand expected to increase during 2018.*

Leave a comment

You are commenting as guest.